THE OLDMAN RIVER AND THE SACRED

A Meditation upon Aputosi Pii'kani Tradition and Environmental Ethics

Old Man made us. I don’t know who made him. I guess he always was. And he was, and is, a God. He was not called Old Man because of great age. The gods can not grow old, they live forever.
— Red Eagle of the Amaskapi Pii'kanis

Impacted by a water storage dam during the late eighties, the Old Man River, in present-day Alberta, has from time immemorial been the sacred center of the Aputosi Pii'kani people's homelands. Using an organic approach to oral tradition, this essay by Jay Hansford C. Vest, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, explores the religious significance of a Pii'kani sacred geography centered on the Old Man River. Considering environmental ethics, special attention is given to the Pii'kani worldview and tradition.


Archaeology along canadas Rocky Mountain eastern Slopes

By Daniel A. Meyer and Jason Roe

Excavations at the Upper Lovett Campsite, Alberta

 
 

Solitary rambles and adventures of a hunter in the prairies [1853]

By John Palliser

Filmed from a copy of the original publication held by the National Library of Canada.

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The Galts and Irrigation in Alberta (1975)

By A. A. den Otter, Department of History, Memorial University of Newfoundland

An examination of the entrepreneurial role in frontier development.


Braves: A JoUrney Into a New Way of Life

By William Singer

"Our history and stories are best told from a first nations perspective."

NA'PI'S RIVER 

By Rick Andrews

Wildlife photographer Rick Andrews reflects on the origins and meaning of the naming of the Oldman River.


Mythology of the Blackfoot Indians

American Museum of Natural History, 1908

The Old Man, or Napi, has been given the first place in this collection of Blackfoot myths by the American Museum of Natural History. The collection, based on oral traditions around the year 1900, aims to present the tone of the mythical age and the supernatural.


CAMPSITES AND CEREMONIAL CIRCLES

A report by the Archaeological Society of Alberta on with teepee rings and ceremonial circles in the Oldman Watershed region.


"DIVERTING AN OLD MAN FROM ALBERTA: THERE IS A RIVER INVOLVED, BUT THE OLD MAN IS NOT IN IT (HE IS READING HIS LOCAL NEWSPAPER)"

An article by Sara Johansson, The University of Western Ontario featured in Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology.